Welcome!

BookWoman began 45 years ago in an upstairs shop on Guadalupe. We started out as a collective called The Common Woman Bookstore (based on the Judy Grahn poem.) From there we moved into Susan's house at the time, and then we became BookWoman and moved to 6th Street. Then we moved to 12th and Lamar, and since 2008 we're located at 5501 North Lamar (the location pictured above).

As you remember your own rich herstory with BookWoman or as you start your sure-to-be-long relationship with her, remember that where you spend your dollars does make a difference.

1. Shop at BookWoman and tell your friends, neighbors, and family to shop here, too.
2. Give a BookWoman or BookSense gift certificate to your friends and to all of the women and girls in your life.
3. BookGroups, order your group selections from BookWoman.
4. Authors, invite us to sell books at your publication parties and speaking engagements.
5. Proclaim your individuality with t-shirts and jewelry from BookWoman.

BookWoman Book Group Discussion

PRAYERS FOR THE STOLEN was awarded the National Endowment of the Arts (NEA) Fellowship for Literature as well as the Sara Curry Humanitarian Award. Clement lives in Mexico City and was President of PEN Mexico from 2009 to 2012.

In Clement’s powerful new novel, Prayers for the Stolen, Ladydi Garcia Martinez tells the story of how she grew up in a remote Mexican mountain village disguised as a boy. This was to ensure that the marauding gangs of drug dealers believed that the village was populated solely by adult women and young boys. No men and absolutely no pretty young girls. It’s a survival strategy that works only marginally well. When it doesn’t work, well, it’s bad. It seems as if these thugs are always lurking, always hovering over villages, always ready to kidnap young, lovely girls. Ironically, it is the lure of this gang life or the flimsy promise of making it in the U.S. that has induced the men of Ladydi’s village to leave. And so her History Channel–educated mother does the best she can with whatever meager means are available to raise and protect her daughter in this tenuous, matriarchal culture. It is her mother’s pliable morality that defines her character and in a paradoxical way arms Ladydi to survive in modern Mexico. Clement’s deft first-person narrative style imbues authenticity to her depiction of a world turned upside down by drug cartels, police corruption, and American exploitation. --Donna Chavez 

Every 4th Thursday, except during the Holidays. New members welcome! Come join us!

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